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Global Civil Society
PPI | Backgrounder | November 1, 1999 | 
Civil Society and the World Trade Organization
By Jenny Bates
Three principles for shaping the role of civil society participation in the WTO are suggested -- mutual responsibility (accountability in return for participation), an institutionalized voice, and global representation (broadening civil society participation to the developed world).


Blueprint | Blueprint Magazine | June 1, 2000
Creating Corporate Social Responsibility
By Debora L. Spar
Big American companies have cleaned up their acts overseas, and find it pays.


DLC | Blueprint Magazine | June 1, 2000
Act Globally
By Claude G.B. Fontheim & Jeremy B. Bash
The President says we must "put a human face on the global economy." This requires a new policy framework that not only promotes economic leadership but also addresses the legitimate issues raised by globalization. Here are four steps for getting started.


DLC | Blueprint Magazine | January 1, 2000
Promoting 'Real' Democracy
By Larry Diamond
Democracy is spreading as never before, but its structures are often wobbly and illiberal. How we can bolster the institutions of liberal democracy.


DLC | The New Democrat | January 1, 2000
The Third Sector in Global Affairs
By Jenny Bates
Civil society deserves a voice, but not a vote, in international institutions.


PPI | Briefing | July 1, 1993
The National Endowment for Democracy
By Steven J. Nider
The NED is one of America's most flexible, non-bureaucratic and cost effective instruments for promoting the global movement toward democracy and free markets.


PPI | Policy Report | July 1, 1991
An American Foreign Policy for Democracy
By Larry Diamond
With the Cold War over, a long-term strategy of promoting democracy should become the central focus and the defining feature of U.S. foreign policy. This can best be accomplished by using the traditional instruments of U.S. diplomacy -- development and financial assistance, debt relief, and free trade -- to encourage democracy.


Admin | Memo | October 28, 1990
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