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PPI | Policy Report | June 12, 2007
Fighting the Pirate Boom
By Edward Gresser
Here are the changes that US policymakers as well as developing-country governments and academic circles need to engage in to restore support for intellectual property rights standards.


YaleGlobal Online | Front & Center | November 1, 2005
Farm Policy and Doha
By Edward Gresser
With farm trade at the political heart of the WTO's Doha Round, other issues will not advance until the agricultural talks yield a result all can accept.


PPI | Testimony | October 27, 2005
Testimony of Edward Gresser Before the Senate Subcommittee on International Trade
The Doha Round is the WTO's major opportunity to help us both secure specific trade objectives, and to fulfill its mission as a foundation of the secure and peaceful world we all hope to see.


DLC | Blueprint Magazine | October 18, 2005
New World Order
By Robert J. Shapiro
Globalization is changing the rules of trade and competition. But Americans can still win with a progressive agenda focused on cutting-edge goods and services.


PPI | Policy Report | April 19, 2002
A View From Outside: Russia and the Case for the WTO
By Edward Gresser
One of the World Trade Organization's most important current negotiations -- talks on Russia's membership -- makes a great case for the institution.


DLC | New Dem Daily | November 16, 2001
Idea of the Week: A Trade Agenda for a New Decade
If the FTAA, the new WTO Round, and the integration of Russia succeed, they will have a simple result: they will create a more open, prosperous and secure world.


PPI | Backgrounder | April 11, 2001
The Crowds Go Home, the Game Continues
By Edward Gresser
Since the tumultuous debate on China's accession to the WTO and permanent normal trade relations (PNTR) last year, negotiations on the remaining issues have progressed very slowly. As a general matter, the new Administration will succeed in the final stages of the talks if it acts on the same principles that marked the Clinton Administration's approach.


DLC | New Dem Daily | July 10, 2000
Senate Debates A Bad Idea For Non-Proliferation Policy Toward China
As the U.S. Senate moves slowly but inexorably toward approval of Permanent Normal Trade Relations with China, it's open season for related but separate China-bashing legislation. Witness S. 2645, "The China Non-Proliferation Act."


PPI | Briefing | July 7, 2000
U.S. Non-Proliferation Policy & China
By Jenny Bates and Steven J. Nider
While national security concerns will remain a central element of the U.S. relationship with China, the approach in the "China Non-Proliferation Act" (S. 2645) handcuffs presidential discretion in foreign policy, unnecessarily singles out China, is a redundant addition to existing U.S. laws and multilateral treaties, and is a blunt instrument that will undermine rather than advance efforts toward reducing proliferation of nuclear and other weapons.


DLC | Blueprint Magazine | June 1, 2000
America's Stake in China
By President Bill Clinton
The United States cannot deny China entry into the WTO. Our only decision is whether we will share in the benefits of China's economic growth, and gain our best opportunity to effect positive change there.


DLC | The New Democrat | May 1, 2000
National Vs. Special Interests
By Al From
The vote on China's trade status is all about election year politics.


DLC | New Dem Daily | March 13, 2000
Idea of the Week: Permanent Normal Trade Relations With China
In an otherwise lethargic election-year congressional session, the vote on PNTR for China will represent, in the President's words, "One of the most important decisions America has made in years."


DLC | The New Democrat | March 1, 2000
The Pop-up Democracy Myth
By Catharin E. Dalpino
Expanding trade with China can only help its social and economic transition.


DLC | The New Democrat | January 1, 2000
The Third Sector in Global Affairs
By Jenny Bates
Civil society deserves a voice, but not a vote, in international institutions.


PPI | Briefing | November 19, 1999
Trade in the New Economy
By PPI
A Reader on Trade and the WTO.


DLC | Talking Points | November 18, 1999
China's Entry into the WTO
The trade agreement signed by the United States and China is a good deal for a number of reasons including: expansion of U.S. markets, access to the world's largest consumer market, and a committment by the China to change its behavior toward more open principles.


PPI | Backgrounder | November 1, 1999
Civil Society and the World Trade Organization
By Jenny Bates
Three principles for shaping the role of civil society participation in the WTO are suggested -- mutual responsibility (accountability in return for participation), an institutionalized voice, and global representation (broadening civil society participation to the developed world).


PPI | Briefing | November 1, 1999
Addressing Environmental and Labor Issues in the World Trade Organization
By Steve Charnovitz
As the World Trade Organization (WTO) convenes in Seattle this month, it should begin to address the link between trade and labor and environmental concerns. By dealing forthrightly with these issues, the WTO can improve public support for freer trade and enhance its own status as a coherent and trustworthy instrument for global economic governance.


PPI | Briefing | November 1, 1999
Preparing for the Battle in Seattle
By Jenny Bates
The use of hyperbolic rhetoric is pushing the trade debate to the extremes and undermining genuine attempts to assess the real benefits and challenges of globalization. More specifically, these groups are communicating a message about the World Trade Organization that presents the world trading system as an enemy to be vanquished, not as a process to be influenced or changed.


PPI | Briefing | November 1, 1999
The Progressive Case for a New WTO Round
By Greg Principato
Key American economic sectors such as agriculture, financial services, high technology, telecommunications, and e-commerce stand to gain significant expansion of trade opportunities if the WTO launches a new round of global talks to expand the international trading system.


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